Tarsal tunnel

Tarsal tunnel

Inside the tarsal tunnel

The tarsal tunnel contains the posterior tibial nerve and several blood vessels and tendons. It begins behind and above the ankle, moving around the inside of the ankle and into the bottom of the foot. If the nerve is damaged or compressed by trauma, swelling or growths in surrounding tendons, blood vessels or bones, a painful condition called tarsal tunnel syndrome can result.

Conservative treatment includes rest, physiotherapy, strengthening exercises, orthotics, heat, compression and anti-inflammatories. Should these options fail, surgery to relieve pressure on the nerve can help in some cases. A surgeon makes an incision through the retinacular ligament, exposing the contents of the tarsal tunnel and hopefully whatever is putting pressure on the nerve. Because of the delicacy of the structures involved, surgery must be meticulous, making it essential that the surgeon be experienced with the procedure.

LABELS:
Tendons
Tarsal tunnel
Tarsal tunnel
Posterior tibial nerve
Blood vessels
Achilles tendon
Tibia bone
Fibula bone
Tibia bone
Tendon
Fibula bone
Retinacular ligament

Text and illustrations by Kevin T. Boyd


Acupressure for feet
Here are lists of acupressure points for the FootAnkle, Sprains and Strains, on PointFinder.org.
If this is your first time, please read the instructions. Don’t use acupressure to replace standard emergency procedures or licensed medical treatment. If you are seriously injured or have acute symptoms seek urgent medical treatment.